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Pediatrics Clerkship- Assessing the Evidence

Welcome!

This guide corresponds to material provided during library instruction for the Pediatrics Clerkship.

This guide is intended to enhance your ability to interpret evidence from the biomedical literature.

The videos and texts included in this libguide should improve your awareness of bias and spin, and emphasize the importance of reading beyond the abstract.

This guide also features links to freely available guides created by experts at other libraries.

File:Unbalanced scales simpler.svg. (2015, January 14). Wikimedia Commons, the free media repository. Retrieved 15:51, April 1, 2019 from https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Unbalanced_scales_simpler.svg&oldid=146452468.

New Literacies Alliance Lessons

The lessons provided by the New Literacies Alliance are brief and correspond to key skills necessary to assess the evidence from the biomedical literature.

Reading Scientific Research Understand the structure and language of academic research articles, including published results from clinical trials.

Evidence Based Practice Acquire the highest quality evidence available that appropriately matches your type of question.

Scholarly Conversations How to dive into a research topic and how to find the best sources for key discussions in the literature.

The number of published trials, 1950 to 2007.

CCTR is the Cochrane Controlled Trials Registry; Haynes filter uses the “narrow” version of the Therapy filter in PubMed:ClinicalQueries

Source: Bastian H, Glasziou P, Chalmers I. Seventy-five trials and eleven systematic reviews a day: how will we ever keep up?. PLoS Med. 2010;7(9):e1000326. Published 2010 Sep 21. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1000326

Key Concepts in Bias and Conflicts of Interest

This helpful guide to sources of bias was created by Lisa Parker, Quinn Grundy, and Lisa Bero. The link to the full text can be accessed at the bottom of this box.

Sources of bias in evidence

Agenda bias: bias due to patterns in the topics selected for study, review or clinical guidance


Methodological bias: a systematic error or deviation from the truth in results or inferences
 

Spin: misleading presentation or discussion of results
 

Publication and reporting bias: entire studies or selected results go unpublished
 

Marketing bias: selected publications or results are highlighted, for example, in commentaries, media reports, seminars or conversations
 

Conflicts of interest are circumstances that create a risk that professional judgements or actions regarding a primary interest will be unduly influenced by a secondary interest. For example, industry sponsorship of research or education is a conflict of interest because it creates a risk that research integrity, medical education and/or patient welfare will be unduly influenced by industry.

Parker, Lisa; Grundy, Quinn and Bero, Lisa. Interpreting evidence in general practice: Bias and conflicts of interest [online]. Australian Journal of General Practice, Vol. 47, No. 6, Jun 2018: 337-340. Availability: <https://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=622520327771924;res=IELHEA> ISSN: 2208-7958. [cited 02 Apr 19].

Link to full free text

Policy and academic milestones in the development of trials and the science of reviewing trials.

Source: Bastian H, Glasziou P, Chalmers I. Seventy-five trials and eleven systematic reviews a day: how will we ever keep up?. PLoS Med. 2010;7(9):e1000326. Published 2010 Sep 21. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1000326