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Google Glass

The many applications of Google Glass

Google Glass Demonstration: Medical Education

What IS Google Glass?

Google Glass is...

  • A way to provide instant supplementary information to lectures without looking away from your classroom
  • A way to share information instantly
  • A way to record what YOU see, hands-free, so as not to disrupt patient care
  • A way to take a picture from the point-of-view of the wearer, without using bulky equipment
  • A way to enhance the education process for KUMC students
  • A way to ease communication between foreign language speaking patients and clinicians
  • A way to record lectures, group discussions and one-on-one instructional sessions for archival and assessment purposes
  • A way to bring pertinent data to a discussion happening anytime, anywhere
  • A way to aid in the translation of foreign language resources for research purposes
  • A way to create POV tours of campuses, classrooms and new technology that showcase KUMC innovation to potential hires/students
  • A way to live stream lectures, discussions and simulations to remote areas (Salina and Wichita)
  • A way to record information at conferences for future review
  • A way to keep presentations engaging and focused on people
  • A way for embedded informationialists to spend more time with clients and less time in front of a computer screen
  • A way to integrate hands-on learning into the KUMC curriculum
  • A way to enhance hands-on video tutorials and simulations

ALL of this, with only one light-weight device.

Google Glass

Feel free to use any of these Google Glass images!

Google Glass on a User

Glass Can Do A LOT Of Things

“GLASS WEARERS CAN TAKE PICTURES OR RECORD VIDEO WITHOUT USING THEIR HANDS, SEND THE IMAGES TO FRIENDS OR POST THEM ONLINE, SEE WALKING DIRECTIONS, SEARCH THE WEB BY VOICE COMMAND AND VIEW LANGUAGE TRANSLATIONS. THE GLASSES REACH THE INTERNET THROUGH WI-FI OR BLUETOOTH, WHICH CONNECTS TO THE WIRELESS SERVICE ON A USER’S CELLPHONE. THE GLASSES RESPOND WHEN A USER SPEAKS, TOUCHES THE FRAME OR MOVES THE HEAD.” - Glass Demo @ SXSW

Google Glass Demonstration: Clinical Applications

Google Glass Demonstration: Academia

Google Glass Demonstration: Patient History

References

Ante, S. E. (2012). Hype and hope: Test driving Google’s new glasses. Wall Street Journal-Eastern Edition, pp. B1-B4

Fox, B., & Felkey, B. (2013). Potential uses of Google Glass in the pharmacy. Hospital Pharmacy, 48(9), 783-784. Doi: 10.1310/hpj4809-783.

Glauser, W. (2013-11-05). Doctors among early adopters of Google Glass. CMAJ. Canadian Medical Association journal, 185(16), 1385.doi:10.1503/cmaj.109-4607

Hong, J. (2013). Considering privacy issues in the context of Google Glass. Communications of the ACM, 56(11), 10-11. doi: 10.1145/2524713.2524717.

Khera, G. (2013). Could Google revolutionise nursing care?.  Australian Nursing & Midwifery Journal, 21(6), 31.

Marks, P. (2013). A healthy dose of Google Glass. New Scientist, 219(2936), 22-23

Overton, G. (2013). Head-worn displays: Useful tool or niche novelty?. Laser Focus World, 49(7), 33-37.

Rocha, C. (2013). Getting in your face. PC Magazine, 16-19.

Shteyngart, G. (2013). O.K., Glass. New Yorker, 89(23), 32-37.

Vaughan, R. (2013). Bringing new meaning to the spectacle of learning. Times Educational Supplement, (5045), 10.

Weiss, T.R. (2013). Google Glass used by teacher to bring math, science to students. Eweek, 2.